Internet Video Series, Part 2

 

Episode 17, Segment 02 of 07

If your setup is typical, you will have best success if you take three specific steps to overcome three problems for your servers. They are:

1 of 3: The computer or appliance hosting each service will work best if you assign it an unchanging, or - static - IP address on your local network so that your NAT router and the other computers in your network can easily find and communicate with the service.

2 of 3: You will need to tell your NAT router how to handle unsolicited, incoming messages for the service.

3 of 3: You will need to inform the people that want to use the service of the public IP address that's assigned to your network by your ISP so they can find you and use the service.

Other AskMisterWizard.com movies have dealt with the first two of these three problems.

If you need help with the first of these 3 problems (configuring a computer with a static IP address on your local network) consult the movie entitled - "Configuring Your Internet Connection Part 2: Static IP Specification".

If you need help with the second of these 3 problems (telling your NAT router about a service that you are hosting) consult the movie entitled - "NAT Routers Part 3: Port Forwarding".

In - this - movie we will concentrate on the third of those three problems: You will need to inform the people that want to use your service(s) of the public IP address that your ISP has assigned to you. We are going to assume that your network configuration is typical and that your NAT router is using that IP address for it's external interface. If you aren't familiar with NAT routers and the way they reassign your IP addresses, then you should watch the movie entitled "NAT Routers Part 1: Simple Routers for Small Networks".

Use all of those resources to overcome the first two problems before proceeding any farther with this movie.

At that point, anybody will be able to access your server(s) if they:

1: have an Internet connection, and

2: if they have the proper client software, and

3: if they know your public IP address.

You can reasonably expect your remote users to handle the first two of these requirements all by themselves. However, they will need help from you to learn your public IP address.


Episode 17, Segment 03 of  07